Last edited by Mutaur
Tuesday, July 28, 2020 | History

1 edition of The status of white pine blister rust on limber pine and whitebark pine in Wyoming found in the catalog.

The status of white pine blister rust on limber pine and whitebark pine in Wyoming

by Donald H. Brown

  • 22 Want to read
  • 36 Currently reading

Published by Forest Insect and Disease Management, State and Private Forestry, Rocky Mountain Region, USDA Forest Service in Lakewood, CO .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • White pine,
  • Pinus flexilis,
  • Pinus albicaulis,
  • Rust diseases,
  • Forest health,
  • Cronartium ribicola,
  • Blister rust,
  • Plant diseases and disorders,
  • Ribes,
  • Diseases and pests

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Donald H. Brown
    SeriesTechnical report -- R2-13, Technical report (United States. Forest Insect and Disease Management) -- R 2-13.
    ContributionsUnited States. Forest Insect and Disease Management
    The Physical Object
    Pagination10 leaves :
    Number of Pages10
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL26492406M
    OCLC/WorldCa7378783

      a result of the mountain pine beetle epidemic, white pine blister rust, and its replacement by more shade-tolerant species. The British Columbia Conservation Data Centre recently elevated the conservation status of whitebark pine from “Yellow” (not at risk) to “Blue.” Blue listed species are those which are not immediately threatened Limber Pine is a five-needled pine, typically m tall, with a much-branched, rounded crown. The seed cones are egg-shaped ( cm long by cm wide) and light-brown to greenish-brown. The cones open to release the seeds and then fall to the ground. Its large seeds are brown, mm long and usually wingless. Limber Pine growth rings can provide information on climate and river flows ?lang=En&n=B7CCD

    Abstract. Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) populations are in decline across the species’ range due to historic wildfire exclusion, mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae, MPB) outbreaks, and an invasive fungal pathogen causing the disease white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola, WPBR).Despite reliance on stand-replacing fires, information on whitebark pine regeneration   spread of blister rust in limber pine to eastern Wyoming, the Black Hills, and northern Colorado has dispelled that notion (Smith and Hoffman b, McDonald and Hoff and references therein, Tomback , J. T. Hoffman, personal communication). The on-going losses of whitebark pine have disturbing implications for both western

      Article Climatic Correlates of White Pine Blister Rust Infection in Whitebark Pine in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem David P. Thoma 1,*, Erin K. Shanahan 1 and Kathryn M. Irvine 2 1 Greater Yellowstone Inventory and Monitoring Network, National Park Service, Bozeman, MT , USA 2 U.S. Geological Survey, Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center, Bozeman, MT , USA White Pine Blister Rust is a fungal pathogen of five-needle pines native to China. It was introduced into North America around Since its introduction it has devastated Western White Pine (Pinus monticola), Sugar Pine (P. lambertiana), Limber Pine (P. flexilis) and Whitebark Pine (P. albicaulis) across the the Rocky Mountains, it has caused the decline of Whitebark pine which ?elcode=NFPUC


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The status of white pine blister rust on limber pine and whitebark pine in Wyoming by Donald H. Brown Download PDF EPUB FB2

WHITE PINE BLISTER RUST. Description. A major threat to high elevation white pines and their ecosystems is a non - native fungus (Cronartium ribicola) that causes the disease white pine blister rust. All of the North American white pines are susceptible to the :// A survey of limber pine (Pinus flexilis James) to determine the geographic distribution, incidence, and severity of white pine blister rust (WPBR) throughout 13 study areas in central and Distribution of white pine blister rust in the central Rocky Mountains based on over surveys conducted between and by USFS Region 2 (this study, Blodgett et al.Blodgett   Draft 2 12 Abstract 13 Limber pine, Pinus flexilis, a wide-ranging tree species in western North America, is highly 14 susceptible to white pine blister rust (WPBR), caused by the non-native fungal pathogen 15 Cronartium Canadian populations in particular have been heavily impacted, and in 16 limber pine was designated Endangered in Canada by ://   White pine blister rust has significantly reduced populations of western white pine and sugar pine in Oregon and Washington, and poses a major threat to whitebark pine and limber pine.

High elevation five-needle pines play critical ecosystem roles in maintaining a diversity of wildlife and plant species, regulating snow and runoff, and   Whitebark pine trees are on the decline as a result of several stressors.

White pine blister rust, caused by the nonnative fungus, Cronartium ribicola, slowly damages and can eventually kill infected whitebark pine trees. Periodic outbreaks of native mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae), quickly decimate infested whitebark pine   White pine blister rust disease severity was calculated for each tree based on cumulative crown and stem damage (Six and Newcomb ).

In subplots, all regeneration (trees blister rust infection was recorded for white pine Whitebark pine mortality related to white pine blister rust, mountain pine beetle outbreak, and water availability. Ecosphere 7(12):e Shanahan, E., K. Legg, and R. Daley.

Status of whitebark pine in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem: a step-trend analysis with comparisons from to Natural Resource Report NPS/GRYN/NRR Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) Species description: Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) is a 5-needled conifer classified as a stone pine which includes five species worldwide.

Stone pines are distinguished by large, dense seeds that lack wings and therefore depend upon Description. White Pine Blister Rust: Introduction: White pine blister rust disease, caused by the fungus Cronartium ribicola, is an exotic-invasive disease of five-needle pines.

This disease is severely affecting whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) and limber pine (P. flexilis) in the northern Rocky Mountains and is well established in five-needle pine stands of Wyoming ://   White Pine Blister Rust is caused by an exotic fungus species introduced from Eurasia in the early 20th century (Peterson and JewelLittlefieldMcDonald and Hoff ).

Whitebark Pine, along with all other five-needle pine species in North America, has been infected by this rust /recovery-strategies/whitebark-pinehtml. SYNOPSIS. Status and Trends of Limber Pine Communities: The range of limber pine partially overlaps with that of whitebark pine, both species have large, bird-dispersed seeds, and both are highly susceptible to white pine blister rust, an exotic fungus.

The two species are so similar in appearance it is only possible to distinguish between them when cones are present, yet they are more   damage to native white pine populations in the central Rocky Mountains.

White pine blister rust epidemiology is strongly affected by genetics, profusion of inoculum, nearness and distribution of hosts, and microclimate (Geils et al.

In order to develop these predictive models, we attempted to characterize interactions between white pine and Limber pine (Pinus flexilis E. James) is under threat from white pine blister rust (WPBR), mountain pine beetle, drought, and fire suppression across its range in western North ://   Combined effects of the recent mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) outbreak and white pine blister rust (caused by Cronartium ribicola) (WPBR) are causing extensive crown dieback and mortality in limber pine (Pinus flexilis) in the central and southern Rocky onal stressors such as climate change and limber pine dwarf mistletoe (Aceuthobium cyanocarpum) may   Although limber pine is an important component of many forested ecosystems in Wyoming and Colorado, very little is known about the distribution of white pine blister rust and its impacts on limber pines.

The objectives of this study were to (i) determine the geographic distribution, incidence, and severity of WPBR throughout central and   White pine blister rust was detected on regeneration in 7 percent of all plots.

The average incidence of white pine blister rust in regeneration plots where limber pine occurred was 3 percent (range percent). Table 1. Limber pine by health status and percent impacted by white pine blister rust (WPBR), twig beetles, and bark beetles in northern   White pine blister rust resistance in limber pine: Evidence for a major gene.

Phytopathology Limber pine (Pinus flexilis) is being threatened by the lethal disease white pine blister rust caused by the non-native pathogen Cronartium ribicola. The types and frequencies of genetic resistance to the rust Whitebark pine, a foundation species at tree line in the Western U.S.

and Canada, has declined due to native mountain pine beetle epidemics, wildfire, and white pine blister ://   Whitebark pine is a 5-needled conifer species placed in the subgenus Strobus, which also includes other 5-needled white pines.

Whitebark pine is a stone pine (so-called for their stone-like seeds). Only five species of stone pines are recognized worldwide, and whitebark pine is the only stone pine that occurs in North. The influence of white pine blister rust on seed dispersal in whitebark pine Article (PDF Available) in Canadian Journal of Forest Research 37(6) June with 79 ReadsThe Canadian populations of limber pine in particular have been heavily impacted by blister rust, caused by the non-native fungal pathogen Cronartium ribicola.

In limber pine was designated Endangered by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in ://?id=whitebark pine (n.). 1. small pine of western North America; having smooth grey-white bark and soft brittle wood; similar to limber Pine/en-en.